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You are here: Home All Documents UN-REDD Partner Countries Africa Tanzania Studies, Publications, Reports and other Resources



Studies, Publications, Reports and other Resources

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file icon MethodologicalBrief_9Mb-17/February/2014Tooltip
English 02/17/2014
This methodological brief has been produced as part of a UN????REDD Programme project to support Tanzania in the development of multiple benefits maps to inform REDD+ safeguards policies, conducted betweenJanuary and August 2013. The project included two working sessions in Tanzania of five weeks in total, covering mapping work and enhancement of national spatial datasets, using open-source GIS software (QGIS, SAGA and GRASS). This methodological brief outlines the technical approaches used in the working sessions.
file icon MethodologicalBrief_23Mb-17/February/2014Tooltip
English 02/17/2014
This methodological brief has been produced as part of a UN????REDD Programme project to support Tanzania in the development of multiple benefits maps to inform REDD+ safeguards policies, conducted betweenJanuary and August 2013. The project included two working sessions in Tanzania of five weeks in total, covering mapping work and enhancement of national spatial datasets, using open-source GIS software (QGIS, SAGA and GRASS). This methodological brief outlines the technical approaches used in the working sessions.
REDD+ has the potential to contribute to achieving more policy goals than climate mitigation alone. In Tanzania, REDD+ is expected to deliver multiple benefits, whose nature and extent will depend on the location and type of REDD+ activity implemented. These benefits include sustainable use of forest resources, biodiversity conservation, poverty alleviation, maintenance of forest dependent communities’ rights, and improved community livelihoods. The REDD+ safeguards agreed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change are intended to guide REDD+ implementation to avoid adverse effects to people and the environment, and to ensure multiple benefits. During the last years, the Tanzanian Forest Service has produced a unique set of forest, socioeconomic and governance related data and maps from 32 000 field inventory plots and interviews with 3500 households and 1100 key informants, which among other sources of data have been used for the production of analysis and maps in this publication. Maps can help to increase understanding of the spatial distribution of such potential benefits, and support decision-making on where and how REDD+ might be implemented. The maps presented in this brochure were developed to support Tanzania’s implementation of the REDD+ safeguards, and planning for multiple benefits from REDD+. Themes include natural forest, biodiversity, ecosystem services, drivers of deforestation and forest degradation, and potential zones for implementation of REDD+ activities
file icon ERBS_report Tanzania hot!Tooltip
English 01/28/2013
The Government of Tanzania, through the UN-REDD National Programme and in cooperation with UNDP, conducted a Capacity Needs Assessment (CNA) of government institutions for REDD+ at Central, Regional, District and Local levels in Tanzania. The CNA also proposes a five-year Capacity Development Plan for the years 2012 – 2017 and several intervention packages for REDD+ capacity development at the different levels of government that allow for short term gains as well as long term strategic objectives to be achieved.
The Government of Tanzania, through the UN-REDD National Programme and in cooperation with UNDP, conducted a Capacity Needs Assessment (CNA) of government institutions for REDD+ at Central, Regional, District and Local levels in Tanzania. The CNA also proposes a five-year Capacity Development Plan for the years 2012 – 2017 and several intervention packages for REDD+ capacity development at the different levels of government that allow for short term gains as well as long term strategic objectives to be achieved.
file icon Intl Year Forests-Tanzania-2011Tooltip
English 08/19/2011
file icon Tanzania Progress Sheet Feb 2011 hot!Tooltip
English 03/09/2011
Enabling Reforms:A Stakeholder-Based Analysis of the Political Economy of Tanzania’s Charcoal Sector and the Poverty and Social Impacts of Proposed Reforms - World Bank - June 2010
ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS OR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY? Transforming the charcoal sector in Tanzania- A Policy Note. World Bank - March 2009
The REDD+ Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) is a tool for classifying and prioritizing potential REDD+ sub-national activities and for assessing critical constraints to project development, especially those associated with the legal, political, and institutional framework for carbon finance. The ROSE tool was developed and refined during 2009 in the course of conducting case studies in Tanzania, Uganda, and Ghana. The tool has two main stages: a 2-3 day key informant or expert workshop, and an analysis of policy, legal and institutional constraints by a small in-country team following the workshop. In the first stage, workshop participants work through a set of steps aimed at identifying high potential REDD ‘project types’ and the main legal, political, and institutional ‘gaps’ constraining development of the identified project types. The ROSE tool is therefore relevant to the development of REDD+ at both the sub-national and national levels; in the three case study countries, the ROSE studies have provided key inputs to national ‘REDD+ Readiness’ processes. This report explains the ROSE methodology and process, and summarizes key findings of the three case studies, including a brief description of the high potential project types identified, and the main gaps or constraints to realising that potential. Contacts: Michael Richards mrichards@forest-trends.org (mailto:mrichards@forest-trends.org) or Jacob Olander jolander@ecodecision.com.ec (mailto:jolander@ecodecision.com.ec)
p 27 -29 about Tanzania
file icon GFI-WP-FCPF-June2010Tooltip
English 06/30/2010
Tanzania is pp 25 to the end
When planning efforts to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, the benefits could be increased by taking account of the distribution not only of carbon, but of other ecosystem services such as biodiversity or non-timber forest products. Here, we map the distribution of carbon stocks in relation to the distribution of these possible co-benefits ofREDD. Other relevant factors such as protected area distribution and fire occurrence are also compared with carbon stocks. A new map of carbon in Tanzania’s ecosystems has been produced for this analysis.
This report examines the scope for Reducing Emissions from Forest Degradation and Deforestation (REDD) in Tanzania, focusing on the developing UN-REDD programme. The causes of deforestation, potential obstacles to the implementation of REDD, and some possible solutions are discussed. This is a Masters students project report, produced by Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (USA), in collaboration with UNEP-WCMC (UK).
This publication was commissioned by the Forestry Beekeeping Division (FBD), with the objective of reviewing the past 15 years of experience with PFM in Tanzania and asking critical questions about the degree to which it has met its objectives of restoring forests and improving livelihoods. The report draws upon a range of studies and on going research initiatives. The authors are Professor Said Iddi (Director of FBD between June 1996 and January 2005) and Tom Blomley (adviser to FBD between 2003 and 2008) . The Report was prepared with the support of the Danish government and the World Bank.