Showing 31 result(s) for:
Tags: Governance
16 June 2015
English

UN-REDD 2016-2020 Governance arrangements: Draft document for Policy Board comments

uploaded by Frances Lim

As per decision 4(i) of the 14th Policy Board meeting, this revised paper presents a comprehensive proposed governance arrangements of the UN-REDD, for comments and feedback by Policy Board members and observers by 14 July 2015.

08 May 2015
English

UN-REDD Programme 2016-2020 Strategic Framework

uploaded by Maddie West

This document was presented to the UN-REDD Programme Policy Board at its 14th meeting held in May 2015, and the following decision made:

Decision #3: 2016-2020 Strategic Framework

The Policy Board:
i. Welcomed the outcome of the process to develop the strategic framework 2016-2020 and endorsed the overall direction of the strategy as outlined in the UN-REDD Programme Strategic Framework 2016-2020 (UNREDD/PB14/2015/III/3);
ii. Recognized that the strategic framework 2016-2020 will be complemented by a fully narrated results framework, further refining the arrangements for Programme delivery at global and national level, and a governance structure that ensures effective and operational governing of the Programme; and
iii. Requested the Secretariat to share a thorough and referenced response to how the strategy follows up to the findings and recommendations of the external evaluation.

12 March 2014
English
07 July 2013
English

Discussion_paper_Final_20130617_FLC

uploaded by Tim Cadman

This discussion paper presents the Action Research Project to Develop a National Quality-of-governance Standard for REDD+ and the Forest Sector in Nepal, which was launched by IGES, Griffith University and the University of Southern Queensland.

The process of developing a voluntary national standard in Nepal through online surveys, key informant interviews, a multi-stakeholder forum and field consultation, has provided an innovative and field-tested apporach to standards development.

19 February 2013
English

Governing the Forests: An Institutional Analysis of REDD+ and Community Forest Management in Asia

uploaded by Tim Cadman


ITTO and UNU-IAS, February 2013 | ISBN: ISBN 978-92-808-4542-6

This report aims to serve as a useful reference for policymakers, professionals and practitioners as they work to promote REDD+ in ways that tackle climate change and biodiversity loss but also respect concerns and listen to the voice of local stakeholders. It presents a background on REDD+, explores ways to link REDD+ to community forestry, and provides lessons learned and recommendations.

The report explores case studies from Bangladesh, India and Indonesia, focusing on successful examples of forest-based climate change mitigation at the community level, and the role of public-private partnerships for community forestry and REDD+. Each presents a different system of forest governance, with varying degrees of community management and success. In reviewing the case studies, the authors conclude that local systems will be a key to the successful outcome of any global efforts for carbon payment schemes in developing countries. Linking community forestry and REDD+ can deliver multiple benefits from climate change mitigation and adaptation, livelihood development and strengthened sustainable forest management (SFM). Criteria for success identified in the report include: linking community forests to international regimes, including those aimed at addressing climate change, promoting biodiversity conservation and sustainable use, as well as building strong local institutions for forest management; connecting carbon management to local forest management practices and economic activities; establishing community benefit sharing; and clarifying land tenure and resource use rights. The report also emphasizes the importance of strong monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems, not only as it relates to carbon accounting and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, but also with regard to the participation of interested parties in decisions regarding the sharing of benefits arising from payments for ecosystem services, and overall forest management.

19 February 2013
English

Governing_the_forests_e-ver

uploaded by Tim Cadman

Governing the Forests: An Institutional Analysis of REDD+ and Community Forest Management in Asia
Jose Puppim de Oliveira, Tim Cadman, Hwan Ok Ma, Tek Maraseni, Anar Koli, Yogesh D. Jadhav and Dede Prabowo
ITTO and UNU-IAS, February 2013 | ISBN: ISBN 978-92-808-4542-6

This report aims to serve as a useful reference for policymakers, professionals and practitioners as they work to promote REDD+ in ways that tackle climate change and biodiversity loss but also respect concerns and listen to the voice of local stakeholders. It presents a background on REDD+, explores ways to link REDD+ to community forestry, and provides lessons learned and recommendations.

The report explores case studies from Bangladesh, India and Indonesia, focusing on successful examples of forest-based climate change mitigation at the community level, and the role of public-private partnerships for community forestry and REDD+. Each presents a different system of forest governance, with varying degrees of community management and success. In reviewing the case studies, the authors conclude that local systems will be a key to the successful outcome of any global efforts for carbon payment schemes in developing countries. Linking community forestry and REDD+ can deliver multiple benefits from climate change mitigation and adaptation, livelihood development and strengthened sustainable forest management (SFM). Criteria for success identified in the report include: linking community forests to international regimes, including those aimed at addressing climate change, promoting biodiversity conservation and sustainable use, as well as building strong local institutions for forest management; connecting carbon management to local forest management practices and economic activities; establishing community benefit sharing; and clarifying land tenure and resource use rights. The report also emphasizes the importance of strong monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems, not only as it relates to carbon accounting and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, but also with regard to the participation of interested parties in decisions regarding the sharing of benefits arising from payments for ecosystem services, and overall forest management.

03 February 2009
English

UN-REDD Programme Framework Document - 20 June 2008

uploaded by Estelle Fach

UN Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (UN-REDD Programme) FAO, UNDP, UNEP -Framework Document, June 20 2008

 

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